Thursday, August 31, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #26: Dutch Spiral

This week I went a little Dutch spiral crazy! It had been over a decade since I made my last one, and I didn't take pictures of everything I made back then.


My beady Facebook friend Nancy Dale started a group this year that has beading prompts (NEDbeads Monthly Beading Prompts) and the August prompt is Dutch Spiral. I didn't plan to have cover it at the same time, and I know it is the 31st, but better late than never! It also makes my blog a little easier :) As Nancy suggested in her group the blog Inspirational Beading has a great tutorial on how to start a Dutch Spiral rope. In her group there are prompts for all the months of this year, and a new one coming soon, click on over and check out it out. You can also find Nancy Dale on Etsy where her shop has over 20 beading tutorials!

I used the suggested tutorial to make my first Dutch Spiral, I used a Rizo beads in the place of the size 8s. It turned out looking alright, but wasn't the look I really wanted so I stopped and started a new rope.

For the second piece I used some old beads and a partial strand of faceted glass.. I had to stop when I ran out of beads (both glass and seed). I wish I had some more but I still like my little sample.

Did I mention that the seed beads were old? Here's the package...I think the Ben Franklin I bought these on clearance at closed in 2009. :( They aren't vintage, but they were old enough the plastic yellowed!

 I went a little overboard with the Dutch spiral -here is the last spiral I made this week. It isn't finished because I ran out of steam and didn't really think through how I was going to finish it. I will add it to the UFO pile and tackle it in the winter!



There are many other tutorials about Dutch spiral. A quick Google or a search on YouTube will lead the way. The best part of Dutch Spiral is the versatility, there are unlimited combos of beads and colors that make for interesting spirals. 

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀

Coming weeks: 

September 7th: Flat Spiral

September 14th: beaded beads

September 21st: Flat Chenille

Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, August 24, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #25: Pondo Stitch

Before I researched for this blog I didn't know anything about Pondo Stitch except that I had seen a project made with it in a magazine years ago (Beadwork- April 2007). I made these bracelets with my new found knowledge.  


In my research for this week I learned that Pondo, occasionally called "African Circle Stitch" has a rich history. Sue Mandel has a really great blog post with information on the traditional stitch. Sue and her friend Nick Kap worked really hard to discover the origins and history of the stitch. I highly suggest clicking over and reading her post about the origins Pondo. Nick Kap and Sue Mandel have included a pdf  in their blog about the traditional way to do Pondo.  Gwen Fisher also has a really good blog post about related bead stitches which has some great charts that cover many stitches including a great visual of the threadpath for traditional Pondo. 

There is more than one way to create the look of Pondo stitch without using the traditional threadpath.  There are many people teaching the varying ways while still calling all of them Pondo. The traditional way that Sue and Nick discovered is similar to brick stitch in that it uses the thread from an earlier row to add the next row. Pondo, like brick also requires good tension control to make the beads lay correctly. 

Honestly, I started my bracelets with the traditional way and didn't like the fact that no matter how much I adjusted my tension the "middle" beads didn't seem to have much reinforcement and flopped around. If this was the past and I was using traditional sinew or even a waxed thread with smaller beads I am sure that the traditional threadpath would be the best, easier, and quicker way. It is 2017 and I am using a single strand of Fireline.* 


found a video on YouTube by Bronzepony beaded jewelry that has instructions on one of the different ways to create the look of Pondo. This is the threadpath I used to make my bracelets although it is not traditional Pondo stitch. I want to make it clear that this is not Pondo stitch, it is a modified threadpath that produces the look of Pondo. Making it this way might be wrong* and nontraditional but the finished net feels more reinforced to me and I think looks better without floppy beads.

Knowing the history of bead stitches and the traditions of beadwork is important even if we adapt the way it is done for our modern materials. If we don't remember the past and give credit to those that beaded before us we negate the fact that beading is an art form with a rich and diverse history that should be celebrated. 

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀

Coming weeks: 

August 31st: Dutch Spiral

September 7th: Flat Spiral

September 14th: beaded beads

Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, August 17, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #24: PRAW

PRAW or Prismatic Right Angle Weave is constructed in the in the same way as CRAW because CRAW is PRAW! To be specific CRAW is PRAW4. The number represents how many sides the "prism" has. Because CRAW has four sides, it is cubic, so it gets its own special acronym... PRAW can have any number of sides.

For an example I made a three sided rope which is PRAW3. Here is the Bangle I made with my rope. I used 8's on the inside two rows (the pink beads) and black 6's across the top to give it a triangular shape. 


  
To make things even more confusing, I jokingly refer to PRAW3 as TRAW- "Triangular Right Angle Weave". I also say it in this loud Velociraptor kind of screeching. TRAW! TRAW! (think Jurassic Park)

Another example of PRAW is beaded bead #24 from last year  as it is made from PRAW5. 

I also made a six sided (PRAW6) as an example. It was quite floppy so I added support beads around it in a manner similar to bead #24
This technique can be done in any amount of rounds but for beading purposes I don't really know why you would do more than six around since it gets floppy.

I took pictures of my PRAW3 under
construction:

Pick up three beads and connect them into a circle (triangle)
   


Pick up three beads and loop around a foundation bead like you would if you were making a unit of CRAW.


Move to the next bead on the foundation row like you would if you were making a unit of CRAW

 Pick up two beads and go through the side bead from the first set of beads and the foundation bead that you started at in the previous step. This is the same as the second step in a CRAW unit.

Pass through the next bead on the foundation row and...

then pass through the "outside" bead of the first set of beads added.

Pick up one bead and pass through the bead opposite, like in last step of a unit of CRAW.

Repeat the thread path and pass through all the beads exiting the last bead added. Tighten up. this is one unit of PRAW, ready for the next unit to be built on top.

This is a top view. The three beads are the top beads of the three sides. If this were CRAW it would have four beads at the top.

 Repeat all the steps using the top beads as the foundation row for the next unit.

This is what it looks like after four rows.


Every row of PRAW3 will have three beads at the top instead of four like CRAW.

If you google Prismatic Right Angle Weave- or look for it on Pinterest, you will find more, I am not going to link to anywhere else since I made my own demo!
_________________________

It is official! My battle album has been posted so I get to share!
Here it is! "Rainbow Coral" because it is a rainbow, and it has the texture of coral. :)

 Currently all of Group C and most of Group B's albums have been posted (Steven is working backwards, not sure why, but who am I to question- since the album with my battle in it has been posted ;)! Voting for group C is also up and ready. Go to the Battle of the Beadsmith: Official Facebook Page and check it out for yourself.  
Anyone can vote if interested and the Battle page is Public!

Next week I will talk about Pondo Stitch- Honestly I have never tried it before and know nothing about it so wish me luck!

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀

Coming weeks: 

August 24th: Pondo Stitch 

August 31st: Dutch Spiral

September 7th: Flat Spiral


Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, August 10, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #23: CRAW Continued

Life is finally back to "normal!" I feel like I lost the month of June with my battle beading and then lost July catching up on all the things I didn't do in June. This week I am going to continue blogging about CRAW. Besides making ropes, which is all I really blogged about last time, the best thing about CRAW is the ability to create shapes with it! For example: LOVE!


Early this year Marcia DeCoster started a blog called Bead Love and shared her design of these cute CRAW letters that spell LOVE. Now that we are eight months into the year there is so much more CRAW on her Bead Love blog as well as designs from her and many other bead artists. Click on over and check it out!

I turned my LOVE into magnets for the freezer.

Bead honesty- to make these letters magnets, I took a 2015 magnet calendar that our car insurance sent us and cut it up to fit the back. I glued the pieces with a common "tacky" glue and they have been hanging out ever since!

Next week I will talk about CRAW's cousin PRAW (prismatic Right Angle Weave)

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀

Coming weeks: 

August 17th: PRAW

August 24th: Pondo Stitch

August 31st: Dutch Spiral


Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth