Thursday, March 30, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #13: Filled Netting

Filled netting is one of the first stitches I learned how to do. I have made so many filled netting bracelets, I made a collage out of some of the better pictures I had! The only one of these that I still have is in the bottom left corner, it is made from lava rock beads that my brother-in-law brought me from his trip to Hawaii!



I learned how to do this stitch the first time from the "Crystal Suspense" project in Beadwork Oct/Nov 2006. I didn't realize until I dug the magazine out that the authors are Gwen Fisher and Florence Turnour of Bead Infinitum. If you read my blog, you know that last year I made beaded beads (Beaded bead #15 and Beaded bead #17) designed by these wonderful ladies! 

The first time I made this bracelet I didn't have the round crystals that they used in the pattern so I used 4mm gemstones, size 15 seed beads and Delicas. I still use this combo of beads today. I made the start of a bracelet for this week and found one of my favorites to photograph.

The top rope in this picture is the bracelet I started this week using Fancy Jasper 4mm beads and Duracoat galvanized eggplant colored 15's.  The bottom is one of my favorite bracelets that I made with a mix of 4mm gemstones and some mixed bronze 15's.

If you want to learn how to do filled netting:

Interweave has the entire year of 2006 (6 issues) available for digital download, this includes the issue that I used to learn this stitch.


and Jill Wiseman has a video that shows how to!


*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀


Coming weeks: 

April 6th: More netting: flat and around things.

April 13th: Flat herringbone Part III


April 20th: Peyote Shapes



Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, March 23, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #12: Chenille Stitch

Chenille stitch is one of my favorite ways to make a bead woven rope. I had no problem finding pictures of pieces that I have made with Chenille stitch! I enjoy trying new things with this stitch. The patterns that can be created and the beads that can be used for this stitch are neverending! I even did some beading this week and made this start of a necklace with small (2.8mm) drop beads and size 8 Demi beads... I would have finished but ran out of Demi beads!

The first time my friend Stephany told me about Chenille Stitch I was skeptical- was there really a new stitch?! I even tried making the same rope with netting to prove a point, but Chenille is its own special thing! It was created by Genevieve Liebaert and brought to popularity on YouTube by Sara Spoltore


Here are a few pictures of other Chenille ropes I have made, since I had pictures I figured I would share:

This necklace originally had a large pendant with it, but I now wear the rope by itself. It is made with frosted permanent finish Tohos.


 This necklace has built in Chenille rope. I attached the wire bail on the glass bead into the stitched rope. It was an experiment that went so wonderfully right! This necklace is actually for sale in my Etsy shop.


This necklace has glass beads that are built into the stitch. It is part of my personal collection and makes for a great summertime necklace! The glass beads get cold where they aren't touching me and I can turn it around for a little neck cooling :)


If you are looking for a tutorial or a "how to" other than Sara's video I can suggest (*see disclaimer):

Interweave has an article with little how to photos.



*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀


Coming weeks: 

March 30th: More tubes! Filled Netting

April 6th: More netting: flat and around things.

April 13th: Flat herringbone Part III


Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, March 16, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #11: Tubular Herringbone

Totally Tubular- Herringbone!

My friend Onye was nice enough to comment a link on my last post that has more info on Ndebele stitch and the people that created it! I am so glad there is more than what I found! There are also some great pictures of their beadwork on the page! If you don't know who Onye is- you should find out- stalk her and her beady creations on Etsy and Facebook!

This week I made a Herringbone bracelet for this post. Bead honesty: I didn't have a herringbone rope to take pictures of. I don't really enjoy the simple seedbead only version of this stitch- I don't think I have ever made more than a simple bracelet with Tubular Herringbone before- including this time :)

  
I put some stretchy cord inside my rainbow tube and finished it with a bead big enough to cover the knots in the cord. The tube wanted to be flat without a core inside it. I always forget that tension is super important with this stitch. I can see where I was lacking precision in these pictures.

Good news! This stitch was one of the easiest so far to find good instruction of:


Fusion beads has a step by step tutorial with pictures.
Art Beads has a video of Tubular Herringbone Stitch with Leslie Rogalski
Jill Wiseman also has a short video!

Twisted tubular Herringbone is basically the same stitch, except the beads seem to twist or spiral around each other. I didn't have time to make a twisty version, but I did have time to find some tutorials!

Potomac Bead Company has a video showing how to do Twisted Tubular Herringbone.
Art Beads also has a picture tutorial of how to do the "twisted" stitch

Jill Wiseman also has a video that has a different approach to the stitch, but accomplishes the same look. She also calls it "Spiral Herringbone"


*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀


Coming weeks: 

March 23rd: More tubes! Chenille stitch

March 30th: More tubes! Filled Netting

April 6th: More netting: non tubular...


Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, March 9, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #10: Tubular Peyote & Cellini!

Totally Tubular- Peyote that is! This week I am going to cover more fun and amazingness of Peyote stitch but in its tubular form. Peyote stitch in tubular form is not difficult, just time consuming and very plain if you use only one size of bead. I like Tubular Peyote in the form of a Cellini Spiral. Most of the time the Cellini spiral is separated from tubular peyote and taught as its own stitch. I think of a Cellini Spiral as "Tubular Peyote with multiple sizes of beads" If you read my blog regularly, you know what fun the flat version of Peyote with multiple sizes is like. Here are a few of my Cellini spirals I have made in the past. 

    
   

Bead honesty: I didn't actually make anything for this weeks post- I had plans again, but life got in my way. I will have to make something for next week because I don't actually have any Herringbone ropes! 

There are a bunch of Tubular Peyote/Cellini Spiral instructions out there and here are just a few:






The most important thing I was ever taught about Tubular Peyote is that you have to remember to step up- and if you are doing a Cellini, you add a bead like the one you just exited. I don't know if that will help anyone else, but that was the ah-ha moment for me.

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀


Coming weeks: 

March 16th: More tubes! Herringbone -twisted and not

March 23rd: More tubes! Chenille stitch

March 30th: More tubes! Filled Netting



Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth

Thursday, March 2, 2017

2017 Thursday Bead Post #9: Flat Herringbone Part II

Three weeks ago I blogged about Ladder stitch and started a little herringbone piece so that I wouldn't explain the start in two different blogs. This post is Herringbone part II. This week I started a little Herringbone bracelet which I forgot to take pictures of as I went, and ran out of thread and steam to get finished but I still took a picture of what I ended up with to show the fun that this stitch can be. The possibilities are endless! I made this bracelet section with size 8's & 4mm glass pearls.


When searching for a good FREE tutorial for this post I came across a couple of sites that are good for learning about this stitch:
 Ruby's Beadwork has a good amount of information on herringbone, and some fun free patterns!  Also the Inspirational Beading Blog has good pictures of adding the "bridge" or "the beads in between" as I think of them.

The first time I was introduced to Herringbone stitch, it was referred to as Ndebele-Herringbone stitch, and I was told it was named after the Ndebele people from Africa who invented it. (I Googled briefly to try to confirm this, but didn't find much convincing information- if you read this blog and know a source for this info, please let me know! I would love to know more about the history!) I was taught it was pronounced "in the belly"- but to call it Herringbone around "modern" beaders because that is what most call it. I was so confused, today I call it Herringbone, but only because a lot of people have never heard the other name, and mostly because it is weird to say "in the belly the corners" when describing how to add two beads at at a time. :) FYI If you are interested in Googling or searching on Pinterest for "Herringbone" inspirations, don't forget to also try "Ndebele" 

One of my favorite bracelets made with a fun variation of Herringbone stitch is in Bead & Button Magazine from February 2009  (the link takes you to where the magazine is for sale on Amazon.) This issue has 8 bracelets in it, including the Cabled Bracelet by Rae Arlene Reller. Here is my version of her design that I made almost 9 years ago!

I could go on and on about Herringbone and all the possible variations, but I will save that for another day -specifically in two weeks when I cover tubular Herringbone, and another day in April when I will blog again. Flat Herringbone Part III (in April) will include more flat variations, including a fun time with 2 holed beads! :)

*Disclaimer:
I am not affiliated with, paid by, or endorsed by anyone. By posting about beading and/or beading products I am not claiming to be an expert, nor am I suggesting the way that I do anything or the products I use are the best/correct/only way. All opinions expressed here are mine, and aren't meant to be taken as anything more than an opinion or suggestion from some stranger on the internet 😀


Coming weeks: 

March 9th: Totally tubular! Peyote & Cellini

March 16th: More tubes! Herringbone -twisted and not

March 23rd: More tubes! Chenille stitch



Thanks for reading & Happy Beading -Beth